18 Other Ways to Say I Will Get Back to You

Why do we sometimes struggle to respond promptly when someone asks us a question? Life can get busy, and despite good intentions, we don’t always remember to follow through.

Recently, I missed a chance to help out a friend who needed my expertise because I dropped the ball on her request. I felt awful about it! Now I’m making a fresh commitment to being more accountable in my communications.

So today, let’s talk about language we can use to let people know we’ve heard them and intend to respond, without overpromising. Here are 15 alternative ways to say “I’ll get back to you” that you can add to your vocabulary!

What are 15 Alternative Ways to Say “I Will Get Back to You”?

When someone reaches out asking for your time, attention, or support, it’s understandable not to have an immediate answer at the ready. However, you still want to acknowledge their ask and signal that a thoughtful response is coming.

Here are 15 ways to let them know you’ll follow up without simply saying “I’ll get back to you”:

Let me look into that and get you an answer ASAP.

I need to check a few things first, but I’ll reach back out today/tomorrow.

Thanks for bringing this to me. I want to give it the attention it deserves. Talk soon!

Appreciate you reaching out. I’m slammed today but will follow up when I have a minute.

Give me a bit to review and I’ll get back to you with next steps.

I want to thoughtfully consider what you’ve asked. Expect to hear from me within a day or so.

Interesting question! I need to do some research before getting back to you if that’s alright.

Can I take a beat to think this over? I’ll circle back by [specific date/time].

Thank you for thinking of me. Let me get through this deadline first, but I definitely want to continue this conversation.

You raise an important issue. I’m running between meetings today, but let’s find a time to discuss.

I really care about this issue and want to give it proper attention. Would it be alright if I got back to you on [date]?

Thanks so much for asking – let me check in with a few folks and get back to you.

I appreciate you reaching out about this. I have a few competing priorities at the moment, but I’ll follow up as soon as I get clarity.

Interesting question! I need to check a few things before responding. When works for me to get back to you?

I want to make sure I understand the full context before responding. Would it be alright if I took a day or two?

Key Takeaways

Be sincere yet strategic in your commitment to follow up. Don’t overpromise on timing if you’re not confident you can deliver.

Give a reason for not responding immediately to validate the other person.

Suggest a specific follow-up time if possible to set clear expectations.

5 Editor’s Choice Ways

Let me look into that and get you an answer ASAP.

This response conveys care while also signaling urgency. By committing to an “ASAP” follow-up, you indicate that responding promptly is a priority without naming a more precise (potentially unrealistic) timeframe.

Thanks for bringing this to me. I want to give it the attention it deserves. Talk soon!

The first part of this response validates that you appreciate them choosing you as a resource. The second part implies you want to be thorough, with “talk soon!” underscoring that a response is forthcoming.

I really care about this issue and want to give it proper attention. Would it be alright if I got back to you on [date]?

Leading with care and intent to give thorough attention sets a thoughtful tone. Proposing a specific follow-up date gives helpful clarity without overpromising on an exact timing.

Interesting question! I need to check a few things before responding. When works for me to get back to you?

This response demonstrates engagement with an enthusiastic tone. Offering to confirm timing for your reply involves them in the process to foster open communication.

I appreciate you reaching out about this. I have a few competing priorities at the moment, but I’ll follow up as soon as I get clarity.

Thanking them for contacting you and explaining your constraints shows respect. A commitment to reach back out once your bandwidth opens up reassures them of your sincere intentions.

Formal Way

Thank you for contacting me about this issue. I am currently facing several pressing deadlines and meetings over the next couple of days. However, I want to give your request the time and attention it properly deserves. Would it be acceptable if I responded in detail by the end of next Tuesday at the latest? Please let me know if that proposed timing does not work for you. I appreciate your patience and look forward to continuing our conversation soon.

Hi Sarah,

I really appreciate you getting back to me so quickly about setting up a meeting to discuss partnership opportunities. I completely understand you have a lot going on this week. Next Tuesday works well on my end for having a more in-depth discussion – just let me know what time of day is most convenient for you. Or if another day that week would be better, I’m happy to be flexible around your schedule. Looking forward to connecting further and brainstorming creative ways we might collaborate!

Best regards,

[Your name]

This formal response opens by thanking the individual for contacting you and demonstrates respect for their time. It then provides context about your current commitments before proposing a precise yet realistic follow-up date. It leaves room for negotiating that timing if needed, confirming that you intend to give their request serious attention. The sample email reply illustrates building in helpful flexibility while finalizing follow-up plans.

Other formal options include:

  • As this matter requires input from multiple team members, could I request by [date] to collate the necessary information so I can provide you with a well-informed recommendation?
  • Given the priority status of your request, I want to be certain I have leadership sign-off moving forward. Once I obtain that, I will reach back out to you within the next 48 business hours.

Informal Way

Hey! Thanks so much for reaching out. I’m absolutely swamped preparing this presentation for tomorrow’s huge client meeting. But I really want to make sure I give your questions the thought they deserve since I know this project is important to you. Would it work if I got back to you on Thursday once this craziness dies down? Hit me up if you need anything before then!

I so appreciate you offering to help me get up to speed on leading the upcoming offsite with my team! No worries at all that you need a couple days – I know firsthand how intense things get leading up to a major presentation. Thursday works perfectly for me…just ping me whenever you have time and have energy to walk me through what leading one of these retreats looks like behind the scenes. Let me know if there’s any way I can help lighten your load in the meantime. Talk soon!

The informal response starts by validating the ask and providing important context about your capacity at the moment. It then suggests a follow-up date while making it clear you intend to thoughtfully respond. Extending the open offer to reach out if anything is needed before then further conveys care about their needs. The confirming email reply emphasizes flexibility and support.

Other informal options include:

  • Awesome connecting the other day! I’ve been heads-down on this new project but want to properly answer your question about [X]. Cool if I take the weekend to figure out my thoughts and then share them with ya Monday?
  • Ooo I love this idea you have! My family is in town the next few days so I’m a bit scattered, but let’s find a time early next week to grab coffee and chat this through in detail.

Is It Correct to Say “I’ll Get Back to You”?

The phrase “I’ll get back to you” has become so commonplace that many of us use it automatically without thinking when asked a challenging question or presented with an unexpected request for our expertise or assistance. However, while the intent behind this default response is generally positive, it does have some potential drawbacks:

  • It can come across as vague or non-committal if you don’t provide additional context about when or how you intend to follow up. This lack of clarity can leave the other party feeling dismissed or deprioritized.
  • If you fail to actually get back to the person in a reasonable timeframe, using this phrase can damage your credibility and reliability in their eyes for the future.

So while saying “I’ll get back to you” isn’t inherently incorrect, it’s advisable to avoid

I am a Certified Life Coach (CPC) and mom of two from Austin, TX. I draw on my psychology background and coaching experience to empower others to grow through my writing.

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