Where were you on that fateful day (9/11)?

Where was I?

I remember that morning so clearly. I arrived at school, and walked into first period algebra class, with a foggy head from staying up too late the night before. Within the last few minutes of class, another teacher walked in on the lecture and said a plane had crashed into one of the world trade centers in New York City.

Immediately, the television was powered on, and we watched CNN broadcast the horror in awestruck silence. The bell rang and we trudged towards English class to find that within the time we had switched out books, and exchanged notes with our “besties”, America’s city had been attacked again.

Image by Tod Rengel

Our English teacher did not teach on “Hester Prynne and the Scarlet Letter” that day, and before even thirty minutes had past, my mother had driven to school and pulled all four of us siblings out. She later said that she desired for us to be together, so she could be 100% sure of our whereabouts and of our safety. Returning home, we were for hours glued to the tube, and at one point I took a break and went to my room to cry. I knew that families had been torn apart, relationships permanently severed, and that life had changed for thousands of Americans.That day it did not matter if you were a Republican or a Democrat, or if you adored or hated President Bush and what he stood for. What was important was your family, and your friends, and if they had been accounted for.

On this day every year, we will always remember those who past before their time, and those who sacrificed their lives to save others. America is resilient and we are healing. When it comes down to protecting what freedoms we have, we will always stand united. To learn more check out this 9/11 memorial website.

Picture by Joe Woolhead, taken from http://www.911memorial.org

Image from: dpi.wi.gov/cal/9-11.html

Where were you that day?

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Where were you on that fateful day (9/11)?

  1. I was with you at school. It was a confusing morning, followed by a horrific and sad day in front of the TV. So many questions racing through our 16-year-old minds. And images we’ll never be able to erase from our minds. I still can’t ever turn the channel if I stumble on a 9/11 documentary. It shocks and awes me over and over again.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s